Film Philosophy

One of my main research interests is directed at film philosophy. I explore how exactly films can be understood and analyzed as being philosophical, as being expressions of philosophical thought in their own right.

That films are not expressions of philosophical thought in the way that academic papers and books are is obvious. However, there are other – intellectually respectable – ways of digging through philosophical ideas and problems. If one assumes that cinematic media can tread along one of these ways: how exactly do they do so?

In my book Skepticism Films. Knowing and Doubting the World in Contemporary Cinema (Bloomsbury, 2015), I approach such questions by exploring what in my eyes is one of the most persistent trends in contemporary cinema: so-called skepticism films, films which dwell on the idea that in a fundamental way we do not know what we think we know about our world. Topic-wise, therefore, they are closely related to varieties of philosophical skepticism, one of the most prominent (and inspirational) problems in the history of philosophy. In the book, I examine current scholarship on the very idea of film as philosophy, work through ideas of skepticism in film theory (Cavell and Deleuze), and conduct detailed case studies of selected members of the skepticism film phenomenon (more information here).

In the future, I will expand the scope of my film-philosophical research, since, strictly speaking, films are merely one of various ways of audiovisally expressing human thought. If films have philosophical potential, then other media forms do so as well. In short, I want to expand my film-philosophical approaches to media philosophy.

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