Research

My research focuses on storytelling across media, on the way in which the expressive potentiae of media of expression such as literature, film, comics, and theatre influence the way in which stories are told.

Within that framework, my research moves between two distinct yet methodically interrelated areas: On the one hand, I am working on theoretical and analytical approaches to contemporary storytelling for children and young adults in literature, film, comics, and other media. On the other hand, I regularly write on topics in film philosophy, as part of an overarching interest in the way in which media of thought influence the expression and therefore character of thought:

Contemporary storytelling for children and young adults
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Contemporary literature for children and young adults is embedded in an overarching (trans)media system: The way in which contemporary books aiming at mass markets are written usually facilitates their adaptation in other media such as film, audio books or digital games; simultaneously, the writing habits of contemporary authors are influenced by the developments of contemporary (digital) media culture. These inter- and transmedial tendencies hold for the other dominant medium of contemporary storytelling as well: Audiovisual media such as film and television largely owe their narrative and aesthetic inclinations to the influence of literature.
In my research, I aim at a better understanding of the ways in which these intermedial relations shape the narrato-aesthetic tendencies of contemporary storytelling for children and young adults. Recent book publications include Kinder- und Jugendfilmanalyse, an introduction to methods of children’s film analysis, and edited volumes on intermediality in the works of authors such as Astrid Lindgren, Joanne Rowling, and Michael Ende.

Film philosophy
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Media of expression do not merely allow for different ways of telling a story; they also present different ways of thinking about the world in general. Philosophy is one of the most general and fundamental ways of thinking about the world. While historically, the proper expression of philosophical thought has been confined to certain ways of non-fictional writing, narrative fiction, and especially narrative film, have long been considered as being inferior in that respect. My film-philosophical publications explore how exactly films can be understood and analyzed as being philosophical, as being expressions of philosophical thought in their own right. My main publication on that topic is the monograph Skepticism Films. Knowing and Doubting the World in Contemporary Cinema.

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